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Obama No Drama - Defending the POTUS since 2012

Posts tagged republicans

Sep 18 '12
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completeculture:

American Politics.

completeculture:

American Politics.

May 31 '12
Thanks for your support! Sorry for the length of my reply, but you brought up a few different points I want to discuss.It’s inaccurate to say Obama is “part Muslim.” Some Republicans claim he is and continue to perpetuate that myth. He’s actually Christian, but 46% of Americans don’t know that. That said, you bring up a valid point: I think because Obama’s father was raised in a Muslim household and Obama inherited a Muslim-sounding name from him, people jump to conclusions and see him as “unChristian” or “foreign.” The prejudice you bring up is very real: politicians use the rumor that Obama is Muslim to make Obama look “bad” because some people wrongly think that being Muslim would make him a terrorist-sympathizer or “less American!” But it shouldn’t matter what religion Obama follows: we’re supposed to welcome people of all faiths in this country!And you’re right to point out that racism underlies a lot of negative discourse regarding Obama. For example, the birthers who claim that he was born outside of the US. There’s no way that, if his father was a white immigrant, this would even be an issue. It reflects deeply intrenched racism that they’d even suggest he’s not an a American citizen. Particularly given that Obama’s birth certificate is publicly available. Also, there’s those “don’t re-nig” bumper stickers. Not to mention these super racist emails people forward to each other. It’s pretty shocking.However, it isn’t fair or accurate to label everyone who dislikes Obama or his policies as racist. Actually, much of the opposition to Obama is partisan in nature. The US is largely divided into Republicans (Conservatives) and Democrats (Liberals), and the former have rarely supported Democratic presidents like Obama. Back in the 90’s, the Republicans treated President Clinton very similarly to how they treat Obama now. Despite the fact Clinton was moderate on many issues, the Republicans still never stopped criticizing him. So Obama, like Clinton, finds himself under fire from the Right by virtue of being a Democrat. What makes his position that much more difficult is that, when he works to compromise with conservatives, many on the Left criticize him for not being liberal enough. Then you’ve got the fact that he’sinherited an economic crisis, and people, for some reason, blame him for it, even though the economy has been slowly improving (as made clear here and here), which is significant given that economists have estimated it takes ten years to recover from a recession—and we’re only on year five.But yeah, we can’t ignore the role of race in much of the public condemnation of Obama, either. There are a lot of insidious ways racism has operated in this election so far. For example, Rick Santorum ranting about Obama’s stance on abortion, remarking that it’s “almost remarkable for a black man to say, ‘we’re going to decide who are people and who are not people.’” The blog STFU Conservatives has argued that no other president has suffered the amount of disrespect Obama has, and they believe a lot of that has to do with his race. Sometimes, I think Republicans forget that Obama is our president, you know the leader of our country. It seems the bias Conservatives have against Obama because he’s a democrat is often compounded by the fact he’s black.

Thanks for your support! Sorry for the length of my reply, but you brought up a few different points I want to discuss.

It’s inaccurate to say Obama is “part Muslim.” Some Republicans claim he is and continue to perpetuate that myth. He’s actually Christian, but 46% of Americans don’t know that. That said, you bring up a valid point: I think because Obama’s father was raised in a Muslim household and Obama inherited a Muslim-sounding name from him, people jump to conclusions and see him as “unChristian” or “foreign.” The prejudice you bring up is very real: politicians use the rumor that Obama is Muslim to make Obama look “bad” because some people wrongly think that being Muslim would make him a terrorist-sympathizer or “less American!” But it shouldn’t matter what religion Obama follows: we’re supposed to welcome people of all faiths in this country!

And you’re right to point out that racism underlies a lot of negative discourse regarding Obama. For example, the birthers who claim that he was born outside of the US. There’s no way that, if his father was a white immigrant, this would even be an issue. It reflects deeply intrenched racism that they’d even suggest he’s not an a American citizen. Particularly given that Obama’s birth certificate is publicly available. Also, there’s those “don’t re-nig” bumper stickers. Not to mention these super racist emails people forward to each other. It’s pretty shocking.

However, it isn’t fair or accurate to label everyone who dislikes Obama or his policies as racist. Actually, much of the opposition to Obama is partisan in nature. The US is largely divided into Republicans (Conservatives) and Democrats (Liberals), and the former have rarely supported Democratic presidents like Obama. Back in the 90’s, the Republicans treated President Clinton very similarly to how they treat Obama now. Despite the fact Clinton was moderate on many issues, the Republicans still never stopped criticizing him. So Obama, like Clinton, finds himself under fire from the Right by virtue of being a Democrat. What makes his position that much more difficult is that, when he works to compromise with conservatives, many on the Left criticize him for not being liberal enough. Then you’ve got the fact that he’sinherited an economic crisis, and people, for some reason, blame him for it, even though the economy has been slowly improving (as made clear here and here), which is significant given that economists have estimated it takes ten years to recover from a recession—and we’re only on year five.

But yeah, we can’t ignore the role of race in much of the public condemnation of Obama, either. There are a lot of insidious ways racism has operated in this election so far. For example, Rick Santorum ranting about Obama’s stance on abortion, remarking that it’s “almost remarkable for a black man to say, ‘we’re going to decide who are people and who are not people.’” The blog STFU Conservatives has argued that no other president has suffered the amount of disrespect Obama has, and they believe a lot of that has to do with his race. Sometimes, I think Republicans forget that Obama is our president, you know the leader of our country. It seems the bias Conservatives have against Obama because he’s a democrat is often compounded by the fact he’s black.

May 30 '12

tpmmedia:

Are Republicans Bending On ‘Obamacare’?

TPM’s Sahil Kapur looks at the GOP ‘s no-win predicament as they try to work there way out of a corner on healthcare: 

As the landmark Supreme Court decision looms next month, Republicans have been privately considering a plan to reinstate some popular provisions of “Obamacare” if it’s struck down.

The revelation sent conservative advocates — who have demanded nothing less than total repeal — into a tizzy, which forced House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) to reaffirm his commitment to “repealing Obamacare in its entirety,” declaring that “[a]nything short of that is unacceptable.”

But more evidence is emerging that Republicans believe that’s not tenable.

Rep. Allen West (R-FL), a tea party darling, told ThinkProgress that he supports preserving three popular provisions of the Affordable Care Act — the same three that his party’s leaders are reportedly considering.

“You’ve got to replace it with something,” West said. “If people want to keep their kid on insurance at 26, fine. We’ve got to make sure no American gets turned back for pre-existing conditions, that’s fine. Keep the doughnut hole closed, that’s fine. But what I just talked to you about — maybe 20, 25 pages of legislation.”

This underscores the GOP’s no-win predicament and helps explain why the party has no replacement plan years after promising one. If they successfully gut “Obamacare” and leave it at that, they’ll face the blame for snatching away its popular benefits. But if they push to keep parts of the law, they’ll face the wrath of powerful conservative groups, which have repeatedly proven their clout at purging Republican lawmakers who buck the right’s demands.

“We would be very concerned about bills to resurrect parts of Obamacare,” said Dean Clancy, the top health care advocate for the influential conservative group FreedomWorks.

A Republican health care aide said members of his party recognize the dilemma.

“I do think some Republicans are finally starting to realize they could be the dog that caught the car,” the aide said.

(Read the full story)